Pavement Management Program:  The City of Glendale’s Pavement Management Program is a multi-year, multi-phased program currently being implemented which is designed to provide a higher level of repair and maintenance to Glendale’s 718 miles of roads and streets.  As part of this program, Glendale’s streets are evaluated to determine the need and type of pavement treatment or restoration to ultimately extend the life of the roadway, thus reducing the need for the higher cost of road reconstruction.

Once identified as a candidate for pavement treatment or restoration, the road is prioritized into the pavement management program as to the timing and type of pavement treatment that will be conducted. Current pavement treatments include preparing for and conducting a variety of topical or surface seal applications, which include:

  • slurry seal
  • double slurry seal
  • PMSS (polymer-modified surface seal)
  • FAST (fractured aggregate surface treatment)

Or a mill and overlay which removes (mills) one or more layers of asphalt and applies new asphalt pavement.

Each application has a unique process . . .

Surface Seal Applications: For roads that require preventive maintenance or in which pavement sections are in generally average or above average condition, many topical applications are available which extend the life of the pavement for many years. Typically referred to as “slurry seal”, these applications may include different products and timing or applications. Glendale currently uses slurry seal; double slurry seal (which makes two passes across the asphalt pavement over a specific time period); PMSS (polymer-modified surface seal); or FAST (fractured aggregate surface treatment) for their surface seal applications.  These applications are topical, with a coating being applied to the existing surface of the street and when needed, this effort is preceded by asphalt repairs or a crack seal application.  Streets crews assess each street prior to a pavement treatment and identify areas for concrete or asphalt repairs, or crack sealing.

Concrete/Asphalt repairs require the removal of a smaller section of concrete or asphalt by lining out, saw cutting and removing the material, followed by replacement of new concrete or hot asphalt and compacting as necessary to provide a quality end product. For concrete repairs, asphalt surrounding the newly placed concrete is typically placed back after the concrete cures.

Crack sealing identifies larger cracks in the existing pavement, or those which pose a future risk to the integrity of the asphalt.  Once identified, crews apply a sealant directly on or over the crack to prevent further degradation or water entering the crack which may impact the subsurface of the roadway and create greater issues in the future.

Once repairs and crack sealing are completed, the surface seal application can take place.  Crews first remove any thermal striping that may exist on the roadway, and then apply the slurry seal treatment.  Equipment typically is wide enough to cover 1 to 1 1/2 lanes of roadway, so this usually requires several passes of the application to cover the entire roadway.  Generally speaking, roads typically remain open for travel during this process; however, traffic is shifted away from the work zone and left turns may be restricted so that vehicles do not travel over the fresh application of slurry seal.  As the slurry seal crosses in front of side streets and driveways, there may be brief period of time where access may not be permitted (15-30 minutes).  While this may be frustrating during the process, it is important to the quality of the application that vehicles do not immediately travel over it.  Construction crews typically direct travelers and, once complete, travel may resume.  Once the surface seal application is complete, the road can be restriped and any valves or utilities adjusted to be flush with the road surface, if necessary.  For areas that require thermal striping, this is usually applied 30 days after the application has taken place.

Mill and Overlay Applications:  For roads that are in greater need of repair, a mill (removal of asphalt) and overlay application is typically conducted.

Sidewalk ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Ramps and Concrete Repairs are completed to ensure compliance with ADA and safety standards. Prior to pavement treatment, ADA ramps are removed and replaced or newly installed, valley gutters may also be replaced or newly installed, and any sidewalk or curbing may be determined to need replacement. Valley gutters are the concrete gutters that typically run across the street, designed to carry storm water across the roadway to a nearby catch basin or storm drain.  Concrete work typically takes place in the public right-of-way and landscape disturbed during this process is restored or adjusted, if needed to retrofit the new ADA ramp.  For the best quality pavement application, this concrete work needs to take place prior to any pavement treatment.

Valve/utility adjustments are completed first to prepare for the milling process.  Valves and utilities that exist in the roadway to be milled are lowered below the surface of the asphalt so that they are not damaged during the asphalt removal.  Once the mill and overlay process is complete, they are raised once again to be flush with the new asphalt surface. When work will take place near a signalized intersection, it may be necessary to also remove or replace traffic signal loops, which are placed in the asphalt pavement at the approaches to the intersection and detect vehicles wanting to enter the intersection; this triggers the traffic signal to cycle through.

The mill and overlay process can then begin, first with crews milling (removing) a predetermined measure of asphalt (1” or greater) dependent upon the condition of the existing asphalt.  Equipment typically is wide enough to cover 1 to 1 1/2 lanes of roadway, so this usually requires several passes of the milling machine to conduct the removal.  Generally speaking, roads typically remain open for travel during this process; however, traffic is shifted away from the work zone and left turns may be restricted.  As this process crosses in front of side streets and driveways, there may be brief period of time where access may not be permitted (15-30 minutes).

Once the milling is completed, crews can apply the new asphalt surface and conduct any compacting of the asphalt. Once again, this takes place typically with several passes of the paving machine and, at times, access may be restricted as the machine crosses side streets and driveways.  While this may be frustrating during the process, it is important to the quality of the final product that vehicles do not immediately travel over the new asphalt surface until it has cooled slightly.  Construction crews typically direct travelers and, once complete, travel may resume.  Once the paving is complete, the road can be restriped and any valves or utilities raised to be flush with the road surface.  For areas that require thermal striping, this is usually applied 30 days after the application has taken place.

Residents, businesses and travelers are typically notified of upcoming pavement applications or restoration via traffic control signage or individual mailers or door hangers, dependent upon the type and impact of the process to be conducted.

For more information on the City of Glendale’s Pavement Management Program, please contact our project hotline at 602.532.6250.

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